Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts)


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Myths and folktales, fairy tales and fables were around even before therewas much of a written literature, and once put on paper this category justkept growing, and growing, and growing. Over the centuries it has reachedin all possible directions, backward into the mythical past, forward intoscience fiction, and sideways into all sorts of parallel worlds. Works canportray hate and war or love and romance; they can solve all our pressingproblems or leave most unsolved; they can be cautionary and didactic orhumorous and, yes, fantastic.

They can and do reflect the situation in allcultures and civilizations the world has ever seen, plus many it is neverlikely to see. Thus, even the most concise compilation must cover a lot ofground, given the vast numbers of books and shorter works, authors, illus-trators, and publishers, and of types, and categories. Fortunately, any presentation of fantasy literature is facilitated by theform adopted by this and other books in the series, since it can focus onmany significant individual features in the dictionary section, which in-cludes entries on literally hundreds of authors, dozens of types and cate-gories, a broad array of standard themes and stock characters many ofwhich are periodically recycled , and the situation in different countriesand cultures.

The history of fantasy literature is traced in the chronology. The introduction, which might best be read after perusing some of the en-tries, explains the phenomenal, if almost inevitable, growth of the field andits increasingly complex categorization—this in scholarly terms but quiteaccessibly to ordinary readers.

Literary History

For those who want to know more, the bib-liography provides a wide range of further reading resources. This Historical Dictionary of Fantasy Literature was written by BrianStableford, who is presently lecturer in creative writing in the School ofCultural Studies, University College Winchester, where he teaches creative vii. He has also taught at other universities inthe past, but the bulk of his time was devoted to writing, and more specifi-cally, writing of fantasy literature, with some predilection for science fic-tion.

He has produced several dozen novels and other works of fiction whilealso translating and editing books in the same field. Stableford has alsocontributed to a number of reference works, before publishing the Histori-cal Dictionary of Science Fiction Literature, the first volume in this series. Such a combination of scholarly knowledge and hands-on writing experi-ence is hard to find, and the advantages will quickly become evident. Jon Woronoff Series Editor. AcknowledgmentsI would like to thank the following people: Neil Barron, for commission-ing the work on his library guide to fantasy literature, which enabled me tolay the groundwork for my studies in the history of fantasy; Farah Mendle-sohn, whose correspondence relating to the taxonomic system she devel-oped was very helpful; John Clute, who generously provided informationregarding the entry list of his Historical Dictionary of Horror Literature;and Faren Miller, who kindly read and commented on the typescript in ad-vance of its submission.

Chronology8th century BC The Homeric epics are recorded, establishing the notionof literary genius and launching the tradition of fantasy literature. Theworks of Hesiod, including the Theogony, record the wider substance ofclassical mythology. Sophocles contributes atrilogy about Oedipus. In B.


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A clerk known as Thomas writes The Romance ofHorn, an account of unjust dispossession followed by heroic exploits, cul-minating in eventual reinstatement. The earliest texts composing the Ro-man de Renart lay the foundations of modern animal fantasy in their elab-oration of fabular accounts of Reynard the Fox. The French romance of Huon of Bordeauxintroduces a chivalrous hero to the fairy king Oberon.

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Early 15th century The first version of the chivalric fantasy Amadis ofGaul is written, probably in Portugal; the original is lost but serially ex-panded versions in Spanish and French boost the novel-length version tointernational popularity. Sir PhilipSidney performs a similar allegorical service for the myth of Arcadia. Francis ofWycombe nicknamed the Hell-Fire Club by its detractors at Medmen-ham Abbey, setting an important precedent for modern lifestyle fantasists. Horace Walpole represents the moralis-tic Gothic fantasy The Castle of Otranto as a translation of an Italian man-uscript.

Leon introduces moralistic alchemical ro-mance to the medium of the three-decker novel.

Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature by William Hughes (Hardback, 2012)

Hans Christian Andersen begins pub-lishing his synthetic fairy tales. The first series of R. Jekyll andMr. Hyde adds a new dimension to moralistic fantasy. The Vor-ticist periodical Blast is founded, taking esoteric allegory to new extremes. The Great Warends in November. Doolittle provide contrasting templates for modern animal fantasy.

Robert E. Mikhail Bulgakov writes The Masterand Margarita, knowing that he will be unable to publish its satanic re-bellion against Stalinism.

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World War II begins in Sep-tember. Sprague de Camp introduces a lighter note to sword and sorceryin The Tritonian Ring. Vera Chapman founds the Tolkien So-ciety. Hoffman provides an analytical account ofthe seductions of erotic fantasy. Samuel R. The International Associationfor the Fantastic in the Arts is founded. Tad Williams launches the Mem-ory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy, intended as an ideological corrective toTolkien.

Laurel K. Theboom in apocalyptic fantasies reaches its peak, demonstrating the awfulextent of contemporary innumeracy. The dif-ference between mental images of objects and the objects themselves isdramatically emphasized by the fact that mental images can be formulatedfor which no actual equivalents exist; it is these images that first spring tomind in association with the idea of fantasy, because they represent fantasyat its purest.

This attitude is peculiar, if not paradoxical. Although it is the most recent genreof literature to acquire a marketing label, it is also the most ancient genrethat is readily identifiable. Storytelling is much older than literature—although, by definition, it has no history other than its literary history—and the overwhelming majority of the stories that became visible to historyonce writing had been invented were fantasies in the Chaucerian sense:strange and supernatural.

Anthropological observations suggest that all hu-man cultures are alike in this respect. The stories that cultures possess be-fore acquiring the faculty of writing, and the stories that provide the foun-dations of literary culture when they do acquire it, are almost all fantastic. We know better now. The prehistory of stories retains a good deal of its mystery, but we cannow understand the situation of stories in preliterate societies. Their authorityand value is often intricately bound up with their seeming antiquity; thatis, the apparent guarantee of their independence and power.

It is, invariably, amagical past, which imagines the world in the process of creation and or-dering—in a time when its present conformation was still in the process ofbeing worked out. We understand all this partly because we can still observe something simi-lar, insofar as a vestigial oral culture survives alongside our literary culture. These are thedeepest roots of modern fantasy literature.

We can also observe the processes of recycling and transfiguration inwhat remains to us of writing, whose early preservation depended onceaseless copying. We can see that certain items of writing were preservedas faithfully as possible because they were considered sacred and unalter-able although that did not prevent variant versions of scriptures beinggenerated.

We can also see that items treated with less reverence—or adifferent kind of reverence—were routinely modified and often expandedby many of the copyists through whose hands they passed.

International Bibliography of Historical Sciences Walter de Gruyter , 13 Des - halaman. Halaman terpilih Halaman Judul. Daftar Isi. Hak Cipta. The A-Z entries cover a variety of works books, magazines, movies, and television shows are all represented as well as central figures Robert Bloch, Angela Olive Carter, Edgar Allan Poe and a number of different themes and literary conventions Doppelganger, Ghost stories, Gothic hero, Southern gothic, Queer gothic.

There is a good deal of international information here as well Australian gothic, Irish gothic, India. Entries range from a paragraph to two pages and include a wealth of see also references in bold. Accessible enough for casual fans of the genre, the book is also suitable for more serious research, with a detailed chronology, an extremely thorough introductory essay, and a bibliography that includes critical and historical works.

Recommended for academic and large public libraries. More than cross-referenced entries cover significant works, writers, and the popular conventions that have shaped this literary genre whose roots reach back to the s. For example, you've heard of Anne Rice and H. Lovecraft, but do you know what graveyard poetry is? Both the chronology and introductory essay provide historical context for the gothic tradition, which continues to exert its influence on popular culture.

The lengthy bibliography provides many avenues for further reading and research. Purchase for public and academic collections supporting a liberal arts curriculum. Hughes puts his extensive knowledge of this genre to good use in this broad work. The dictionary itself features a chronology, a substantial and informative introduction to the Gothic, a dictionary of terms, and a concluding bibliography.

The latter is worth noting. Hughes breaks down entries for further reading by topic and Gothic author, rather than arranging entries by author's last name. This arrangement will allow users of this dictionary to find further reading on their topics very easily.

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As the title indicates, this dictionary focuses on literature, as opposed to the recently revised The Handbook of the Gothic, edited by Marie Mulvey-Roberts, which broadened its focus to include topics like film. Despite this, the two works have considerable crossover; many terms about the Gothic appear in both. In fact, Hughes contributed entries to the Handbook. The Historical Dictionary will be useful for libraries that lack a reference guide for the Gothic or libraries looking to update their reference collection.

Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and general readers. He also served as joint president of the International Gothic Association and is the founder editor of the Association's journal, Gothic Studies.

Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts) Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts)
Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts) Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts)
Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts) Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts)
Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts) Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts)
Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts) Historical Dictionary of Gothic Literature (Historical Dictionaries of Literature and the Arts)

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